Mobile Takes Center Stage in the Marketing Mix

Spring always seems to bring big change. With nature it’s obvious. But reviewing the season’s digital marketing buzz, I am getting a distinct feeling that Spring 2015 may be the watershed for mobile’s emergence as the priority marketing platform from this quarter forward. If so, what could that mean for marketers? A lot. Let’s consider four areas in which integrated marketing communications (IMC) consulting might be affected by mobile’s unequivocal kingpin status in the marketing mix.

Audience Measurement – Shifting media consumption habits have been slowly wreaking havoc with advertising, marketing and PR budgets for the past decade. In barely two years, we have seen preferred metrics change from “impressions” to “estimated media values” for PR and from “likes” and Klout scores to “click-through rates” for social media and mobile advertising. Remember when Nielsen’s diary method for measuring audience types was used to spend millions in ad campaigns? No more. The folks stroking checks for their products and services want more data, less conjecture. The check writers–who should now probably be called “revenue enablers”–can get more credible data, thanks to mobile. Mobile media analytics providers–such as Google Mobile Analytics and Mixpanel–can measure the potential customer’s behavior, buying habits, search habits and geographic locations in real time. Other mobile metrics providers can even tell you if a mobile device user is walking, seated or slightly reclined when viewing content. These new mobile audience “profiling” tools mean more homework for marketers, unless they want to present a campaign without the answers to Big Data questions that likely will be asked in a future presentation. After all, information is not just power in the digital age, it’s pervasive.

Reporting – While related to measurement, reporting about an IMC campaign that rests heavily on mobile engagement can produce spotty results over the course of the campaign. As a result, IMC crafters need to practice the art of managing expectations and the routine of educating potential and current clients. Everyone generally knows that attention spans of mobile users are shorter, but it’s critical for marketers to now educate clients and potential clients that in a mobile environment any event or Twitter trend–an earthquake in Nepal or a local shooting–may skew mobile engagement by a targeted audience segment at any given time. Preparing the potential client for these blips in engagement will be key for   cross-marketing in the mobile era.

Multichannel Balance – Clearly, the transition to mobile screen dominance dictates that multichannel campaigns must be carefully crafted to build a client’s mobile contact databases and directly and regularly provide mobile content. Google’s change in ranking websites that are mobile-friendly also will create the need for a stronger campaign emphasis on search and mobile ad buys. The Mobile Marketing Association has a new study [Cross-Marketing Effectiveness] making this case and caps a roadshow about it in Dallas later this month.

Content Creation – For the mobile consumer, content must be succinct and readable in small doses. While this is the current trend of content delivery, mobile screen dominance will force content creators to find creative ways to produce even more visual elements for sharing top-line information. The trend toward short online video content is yet another case in point. Innovators in the field of content management on the mobile platform, like Aussie SaaS start-up Mobit, will be well-positioned to take advantage of the mobile platform shift in marketing.

As an observer of media and marketing, I am giddy about the realization of mobile’s dominance in the marketing mix after so many years of forecasting. But as a practitioner, I am sobered by the work that lies ahead to re-calibrate mobile-dominated IMC for maximum efficacy.

Jobs Report: Is Tech Part of Our Recovery?

Chart of Jobs Growth in US, 2008-2011
Job growth since 2008 Infographic: Visual.ly
Chart of Jobs Growth in US, 2008-2011

Job growth since 2008
Infographic: Visual.ly

This morning, my WTOP.com SMS alert told me what I used to report every month on the radio: last month’s jobless rate. It’s good news by most standards. Six percent (6.3 to be exact) of people actively seeking work is the lowest rate in 5 1/2 years. Nearly 290,000 new jobs added. All good indicators our economy is bouncing back.

But are Baby Boomers bouncing back, and if so, how? The Urban Institute’s report on joblessness among the 50+ crowd, coupled with a GAO analysis, during The Great Recession painted a pretty dismal portrait of the financial well-being of this pre- and currently retired demographic in the US.

Being a techy Boomer, myself, I am curious about how the tech sector is playing a role in helping my folks out of the most recent jobs rut.  So, this May, I am putting that question out to my network…on Facebook, Google+, Twitter, LinkedIN and traveling around the country to investigate it.

As part of my personal research, I’d like to find success stories of Boomers using technology to bounce back from a tough financial spot. If you can help with this research, send or Tweet me a link or a personal contact that I can interview anywhere in the country.

And if you’re a Boomer who wants to jump into the tech economy (check out Xconomy.com) to improve your financial position, here are five revenue-creation companies you may want to explore:

 

1. E-Bay

2. Flex Jobs

3. Postmates

4. Thrillist

5. Lyft

Subscribe to this blog, and I’ll help keep you posted on this and other digital cues in the rapidly changing world we share.

Social Media Niche Management

Niche Knowledge

Fall 2010 may go down in digital media history as a major turning point in the mass media landscape. Searching online and separately noting today’s Washington Women in PR’s luncheon speaker insights about the use of social media as integral to marketing strategy brought back memories of the “dialectic” theory of historical events. The theory requires that major historical trends interact with “visionaries” or “individual actors” who understand and capitalize upon these trends to transform society, conventional thinking or business practices.

Dialectic theory seemed to emerge this week with the occurrence of two events–a presentation and a conference. Ironically, the sources of our knowledge are so technology-centered and diverse that many of us flock to “live” presentations to help us digest and sort out our Information Age overload. That’s exactly what was so powerful about Webb Media Group’s tech talk for Washington Women in PR over lunch today. In about an hour, WG’s Principal Amy Webb creatively outlined how marketing/PR executives could better sort out how to use social media applications for audience engagement, brand awareness and customer conversion.

Three focal points helped simplify Webb’s message for both novice and experienced social media marketers. The first was function, that is, what “utility” does a social media application perform? Webb identified seven social media platform trends that provide utilitarian niches for marketers to customize for specific campaign or communications analysis needs.

Her other focal points were strategic in nature: Are communicators engaging target audiences by using social media in ways that are habit-forming/effective and comprehensive?

As Amy posed those questions in Washington, digital media marketing executives in Boston presented case studies about products and causes that answered the questions raised in Washington. But they also posed new ones, about social media marketing and metrics, the next generation of digital marketers and more.

The two meetings clearly show that the so-called “changing media landscape” has reached the tipping point. The Brave New World of Digital Communications is our reality. Clearly, it’s a world in which–through social media–the individual can wield as much power (and sometimes more) as the amorphous brand. As communicators in uncharted territory, our best bet is making sure we understand social media and how to deploy it for our clients’ best advantage.